Tag Archives: Northern Ireland

The North Star Project, Summer Report Number Five, Northern Ireland By Megan Hennen Northern Ireland Report #1

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The North Star Project, Summer Report Number Five, Northern Ireland By Megan Hennen Northern Ireland Report #1

First and foremost, it’s important to understand that the island of Ireland is not a single country. The island is divided into two parts, the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
There’s a long and confusing history riddled in conflict between the Irish and the British Crown that eventually led to the Government of Ireland Act of 1920 resulting in the Partition of Ireland meaning Ireland became a free state aside from the Irish province of Ulster (Northern Ireland) which would remain in a union with the UK and thus forming the border dividing the island. The decision for Ulster to remain united with England ultimately came about by its population, which had been for the most part comprised of British and Scottish protestant settlers who did not wish to separate UK.

Although more people in Northern Ireland view themselves as British and wish to remain in a union with the UK, there are nearly just as many people who identify as being Irish and who’d like for nothing more to form a unified Ireland separate from British rule. These conflicting desires within NI have been the foundation of decades of violence, which the people of Northern Ireland often refer to as ‘the Troubles’. My semester abroad was focused on these violent times and what’s currently being done to propel to peace process forward, as well.

Located in Derry/Londonderry Northern Ireland, this monument is representative of the peace process, the people of Ulster ‘reaching across the divide’ and moving past differences.
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For all of the North Star Project 2013-2014 Reports, see https://mgjnorthstarproject.wordpress.com/
For all of the North Star Project 2013 Summer Reports, see http://www2.css.edu/app/depts/HIS/historyjournal/index.cfm?cat=10

The North Star Project 2013-2014 School Year Reports: The Middle Ground Journal’s collaborative outreach program with K-12 classes around the world. We acknowledge North Star Academy of Duluth, Minnesota as our inaugural partner school, and the flagship of our K-12 outreach program. We also welcome Duluth East High School, Dodge Middle School and other schools around the world to the North Star Project. The North Star Project has flourished since 2012. For a brief summary, please see recent articles in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History, at:

http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2013/1305/Opening-The-Middle-Ground-Journal.cfm

https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/january-2014/embracing-oa-universities-adopt-open-access-policies-for-faculty-journal-publications

The Middle Ground Journal will share brief dispatches from our North Star Project student interns, particularly from those who are currently stationed, or will soon be stationed abroad. We have confirmed student interns who will be reporting from Mongolia, Southern China, Shanghai, northeastern China, The Netherlands, Tanzania, Ireland, England, Finland, Russia, and Haiti. We also have students developing presentations on theatrical representations of historical trauma, historical memory, the price individuals pay during tragic global conflicts, and different perceptions of current events from around the world. We will post their dispatches here, and report on their interactions with the North Star Project students and teachers.

Hong-Ming Liang, Chief Editor, The Middle Ground Journal, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN, USA

(c) 2013-present The Middle Ground Journal. See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Twenty — Sunday, Bloody Sunday, Northern Ireland, by Megan Hennen

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Twenty — Sunday, Bloody Sunday, Northern Ireland, by Megan Hennen

‘Sunday Bloody Sunday,’ a song by the rock band U2, refers to the 1972 event known as ‘Bloody Sunday’, which had unfolded in the Bogside.  On January 30, 1972, Civil Rights marchers made their way around the streets of Derry in what was anticipated to be a peaceful protest against Irish Internment.  The British Army stationed in Derry created a blockade preventing the parade from entering the city center.  The bulk of the parade rerouted and made its way to the Free Derry Corner in the Bog.  However, some of boys stayed to throw stones at the soldiers, as a result, some soldiers relocated to the Corner with the rest of the parade, and within the next thirty minutes, chaos ensued, leaving 13 civilians injured and another 13 dead, 7 of those shot dead being under the age of 20.

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Bloody Sunday is still holds a lot of relevance in Northern Ireland today.  The victims both dead and alive have yet to receive the justice they’ve been searching for as the soldiers involved had been deemed innocent.  Surviving victims and the families of the deceased have continued to campaign for another inquiry of the events and wanting to clear the names of the civilians and bring the soldiers they deem guilty to justice.

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These past months since I’ve returned from Northern Ireland, I have seen references to Bloody Sunday used as a marketing ploy a handful of times, namely in the food industry, and this has been a cause for some controversies.  With that being said, in this day and age where it is almost second-nature to be politically correct, I assume these references are made more with the song in mind, unknowing of the U2 reference to the 26 victims of Bloody Sunday.  Instead of becoming grossly offended at another person’s ignorance, it is at times like these when educating someone will be more effective than belittling them.

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[Photo 1] Banner used in the Civil Rights march now hanging in the Museum of Free Derry. The dark spot in the middle is a blood stain from Bloody Sunday.
[Photo 2] The mural ‘Bloody Sunday’ (painted by the Bogside Artists) in the Bog depicts the death of Jackie Duddy with Fr. Daly waving a bloodied, white handkerchief.
[Photo 3] The Free Derry Corner in the Bog.
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For all of the North Star Project 2013-2014 Reports, see https://mgjnorthstarproject.wordpress.com/

For all of the North Star Project 2013 Summer Reports, see http://www2.css.edu/app/depts/HIS/historyjournal/index.cfm?cat=10

The North Star Project 2013-2014 School Year Reports: The Middle Ground Journal’s collaborative outreach program with K-12 classes around the world. We gratefully acknowledge North Star Academy of Duluth, Minnesota as our inaugural partner school, and the flagship of our K-12 outreach program. 

Under the leadership of our North Star host teachers and student interns, The North Star Project has flourished for two years. For a brief summary, please see a recent article in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History, at:

http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2013/1305/Opening-The-Middle-Ground-Journal.cfm

Having re-tooled and re-designed the collaborative program, we are drawing on the experience of our veteran student interns, ideas from our host teachers, and new projects provided by our incoming student interns. This school year The Middle Ground Journal will share brief dispatches from our North Star Project student interns, particularly from those who are currently stationed, or will soon be stationed abroad. As of the time of this report we have confirmed student interns who will be reporting from Mongolia, Southern China, Shanghai, northeastern China, The Netherlands, Tanzania, Ireland, England, Finland, Russia, and Haiti. We also have students developing presentations on theatrical representations of historical trauma, historical memory, the price individuals pay during tragic global conflicts, and different perceptions of current events from around the world.  We will post their brief dispatches here, and report on their interactions with the North Star students and teachers throughout the school year.

Hong-Ming Liang, Chief Editor, The Middle Ground Journal, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN, USA, 2013-2014 School Year

(c) 2013 The Middle Ground Journal, Number 7, Fall, 2013. See Submission Guidelines page for the journal’s not-for-profit educational open-access policy.

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Filed under Megan Hennen, North Star Student Editors, Professor Hong-Ming Liang