Food and the World – A Stollen Tradition – by Gabrielle Trelstad . The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy, at NorthStarReports.org and facebook.com/NorthStarReports

Food and the World – A Stollen Tradition – by Gabrielle Trelstad . The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy, at NorthStarReports.org and facebook.com/NorthStarReports

In the 1800s, some of my ancestors immigrated to the United States from Germany. Among the things that they brought over from Germany was a Christmas tradition – Stollen. Stollen is a German bread containing a variety of fruits, nuts, spices, and flavorings. In Germany it is traditionally baked and served during Christmas time.

My maternal grandmother was very proud of this Stollen tradition, and every year at Christmas time she would make Stollen for each of her six children and their families. She would make multiple variations of Stollen in order to meet the different tastes of her children. The variation that my family would get consisted of nuts and raisins being added to the bread, omitting the candied fruit that is typically added.

While I can imagine that making multiple versions of Stollen must have been quite an undertaking, considering what a labor of love making homemade bread is, my grandmother never seemed to complain. I can’t help but think that she was so willing to make Stollen in varied forms each year as a way to connect her children and grandchildren with her parents and grandparents, as well as the homeland that her grandparents left behind.

Gabrielle is a student of History and English, and is a member of the class of 2020.

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The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy (http://NorthStarReports.org) is a student edited and student authored open access publication centered around the themes of global and historical connections. Our guiding philosophy is that those of us who are fortunate enough to receive an education and to travel our planet are ethically bound to share our knowledge with those who cannot afford to do so. Therefore, creating virtual and actual communities of learning between college and K-12 classes are integral to our mission. In five years we have published over 300 articles covering all habitable continents and a variety of topics ranging from history and politics, food and popular culture, to global inequities to complex identities. These articles are read by K-12 and college students. Our volunteer student editors and writers come from Nursing to Biology, Physical Therapy to Business, and remarkably, many of our student editors and writers have long graduated from college. In addition to our main site, we also curate a Facebook page dedicated to annotated news articles selected by our student editors (http://www.facebook.com/NorthStarReports). We have an all volunteer staff. The North Star Reports is sponsored and published by Professor Hong-Ming Liang and NSR Student Editors and Writers. For a brief summary of our history, please see the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History, at: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2013/1305/Opening-The-Middle-Ground-Journal.cfm

Professor Hong-Ming Liang, Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief and Publisher, The North Star Reports. Kathryn Marquis Hirsch, Managing Editor, The North Star Reports. Ellie Swanson and Marin Ekstrom, Assistant Managing Editors, The North Star Reports.

(c) 2012-present The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy http://NorthStarReports.org ISSN: 2377-908X The NSR is fully funded by an annual donation from Professor Liang. The NSR is sponsored and published by Professor Hong-Ming Liang, NSR Student Editors and Writers. See Masthead for our not-for-profit educational open- access policy.

 

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